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Reason To Bleed from Steven Bush on Vimeo.

A story about taking risks and living with the consequences, Austin singer-songwriter Matt McCloskey, wrestles with the dark reality of self doubt and fear through a year long struggle to release his 3rd album, The Hard Rains.

Synopsis:
Everyone bleeds. But artists bleed in a unique way. Hemingway understood this well when he wrote: “There’s nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at the typewriter and bleed.” But why endure the pain of creating? An artist must have his reason. Steven Bush’s documentary short film “Reason to Bleed” tells the story of Matt McCloskey, a singer-songwriter from Austin, Texas, and the discovery of his reason to bleed.

In an early scene, Matt McCloskey sits on his back porch and tells his story with brutal honesty. In January 2010, Matt explains, he released “Let It Burn”, his second record. It was enthusiastically received and he experienced the euphoria of success. But when the enthusiasm dwindled, so did the euphoria, leaving Matt in an artistic lull that bred depression and anger. After a conversation with his father, Matt realized that his depression and anger was rooted in his need for success, which adulterated his original love for music and creating. Acknowledgment of this tainted view of art led him to write “The Hard Rains”, a record he loved and was tremendously proud of. But fear of how the record would be received drove him to shelve it for a year. Matt’s decision to release this record did not come easy.

"Reason to Bleed" focuses on the time leading up to the release of "The Hard Rains". The camera follows Matt as he navigates his busy daily life as a father of three beautiful children, a husband to a loving wife, an owner of a successful web design business, and a singer-songwriter in the Live Music Capital of the World, a city teeming with artists searching for their reasons to bleed.

Directed by Steven Bush
Shot by Steven Bush & Scott Wade
Music by Matt McCloskey
Logo by M. Brady Clark

BEAUTY OF MATHEMATICS from PARACHUTES on Vimeo.

"Mathematics, rightly viewed, possesses not only truth, but supreme beauty — a beauty cold and austere, without the gorgeous trappings of painting or music." —Bertrand Russell

By Yann Pineill & Nicolas Lefaucheux

parachutes.tv

Chewbatrilby:

It’s been a great pleasure to attend the i-docs symposium that was held in Bristol last week where I had two presentations, one being about the connection between interactive documentaries and collaborative models. 
During that presentation, I realized that we - as a growing tribe of practitioners and scholars - needed structure, methods and ethic to build a stronger ecosystem able to sustain our productions. 
I’m starting “The Trilby" to present my views on the interactive documentary field and share my thoughts about it. I see this new blog (published under the Chewbahat umbrella) as a place where discussions happen, a place of exploration and interrogation. 
Welcome to the Trilby then and see you around very soon.
Gerald

Chewbatrilby:

It’s been a great pleasure to attend the i-docs symposium that was held in Bristol last week where I had two presentations, one being about the connection between interactive documentaries and collaborative models. 

During that presentation, I realized that we - as a growing tribe of practitioners and scholars - needed structure, methods and ethic to build a stronger ecosystem able to sustain our productions. 

I’m starting “The Trilby" to present my views on the interactive documentary field and share my thoughts about it. I see this new blog (published under the Chewbahat umbrella) as a place where discussions happen, a place of exploration and interrogation. 

Welcome to the Trilby then and see you around very soon.

Gerald

FIRST KISS from Tatia Pilieva on Vimeo.

We asked twenty strangers to kiss for the first time…

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Since the French version of Grozny has been released - soon followed by the English and Russian version - we asked Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko to tell us more about that project. 

1. Can you tell us how it all began? Where does the idea comes from?

Oksana Yushko:
In 2008-2010 we, Olga Kravets, Maria Morina and Oksana Yushko, were part of Objective Reality online workshops for emerging photographers. Then we met offline, and later decided to do something together. The idea about Grozny came from Olga, and Maria came up with the concept of nine cities hidden in one. We discussed it and made our first trip to Grozny in November 2009.


2. How long did the production took and how did you financed it?

Oksana Yushko:
We have been shooting the project during the last 5 years. Most of the project was sel-funded. Sometimes we had assignments for different media, but mostly we planned our trips trying to attend the most meaningful events in that region during the year. Later we did a crowdfunding campain on 
emphas.is that allowed us to gather money for the next 2 trips to Chechnya. Also Olga Kravets received the grant from Magnum Emergency Fund that also covered part of the expenses. 

3. What was the challenges that you faced during this production?

Oksana Yushko:
We discovered a new world of Muslim part of Russia with totally different mentality. During work we learned from each other. We tried to combine three different points of view trying to create more objective picture.


4. What kind of support did you receive all along these 4 years?

Maria Morina:
We received all kinds of support - our colleagues photographers helped us with shaping the idea and with contacts with the media. Yuri Kozyrev, an internationally acclaimed photographer from Noor, helped us a lot from the very beginning. He was our mentor and producer, and an editor for the first two years, helping us with the project when he had some time in his busy schedule. Lisa Faktor, Anna Zekria, Andrei Polikanov, Stenley Greene, and Anna Nemtsova, - all of them and many of our other friends helped us to make the project happen. We also worked closely with an NGO Joint Mobile Group, without which it would not be possible to tell the stories of victims of torture in Grozny. And we are glad that finally we teamed up with our curator, Anna Shpakova and Jose Bautista, who created a unique soundscape for the project.


5. What was your view on interactive documentaries, why did you choose to use that medium?

Olga Kravets:
Telling the story of Chechnya in the right way would not be possible, if we would be just photographers. If you don’t have a photograph, you don’t have a story. In web-doc, each issue gets it’s own medium and it also helps you to protect your characters. We realized it during our first trip, while on the ground, in Chechnya, and it was the time when the first great web-docs were released, and ever since we worked on the project with the web-doc in mind. 

Maria Morina:
Using all kinds of media - stills and moving images, texts and sounds -  helps you to create a narrative that will engage viewer on different levels. And the web-documentary format allows you to attract the maximum amount of people to a ‘slow journalism’ project.

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6. Do you think that photojournalism and long form stories can benefit from these new form of storytelling?

Maria Morina:
Absolutely. Especially long term projects with the massive amount of visual information. Web-documentary with its additional online tools gives you a new way to tell a complicated story. And maybe along with the evolvement of technologies, there will be more possibilities to engage audience.


Olga Kravets:
I think what’s really important is to choose a medium that is suited for your very own story and material. Don’t do a web-doc, just because it’s trendy, think why you need it. With Grozny, I spent a lot of time explaining traditional broadcasters why I am not making a film, why it will be just what it is, an interactive doc. But my next project will be a film, which might not necessarily need a web-doc on top of it. 


7. What do you think about the situation there, since you went back in october, are things changing?

Olga Kravets:
The whole point of working on it for four years was to show Chechnya in transformation. Last time I went there, the republic was full of rumours of what is going to happen after the Olympics - opinions ranging from “nothing” to “all-Caucasus war”. People live in very uneasy expectations. And you can literally feel that tension in the air. And you get infected with this. Right from the last trip I went straight into the postproduction studio where I had to review all the work from the four years, so it’s actually very hard to slice it now into some separate impressions. I think the last trip really summed up everything for me. This is also where I have written the voiceover texts, which were heavily influenced by my daily meetings and impressions.


8. Can you tell us more about your next projects, are planning to continue your work on Chechnya?

Maria Morina:
I am planning to make a documentary film about Joint Mobile Group and their work in Chechnya and Russia. They investigate the cases of kidnapping and torture. They only deal with people who agree to go ahead completely and make their cases public. Most of them had the same kind of experience of police abuse, and they feel that they can do something to fight the system of institutionalized oppression in Russian Federation.


Olga Kravets: 
Caucasus will be always my biggest passion, I assume. Currently I am working on a project about the Chechen diaspora abroad, trying to give another prospective to the same story. I do have few other projects in the bag, I’ve been just nominated for the Film Prize of Robert Bosch Stiftung in Germany with my future full-length film, but I can’t tell you the synopsis due to the sensitivity of the material. 


Oksana Yushko:
We are planning to come back to Chechnya with some educational programs in art and photography. This year we made a trip with a humanitarian mission of clowns from The Gesundheit Institute to the Chechen hospitals, nursing homes, schools, orphanages. The feedback we received was so significant for all of us that we decided to do it again. Let’s see what will happen. 

9. What was your experience working with Chewbahat?

Olga Kravets: I met Gerald at a World Press Photo multimedia brainstorming session in 2012 and it took us about a year to decide that we want to realise this project together, and I am really happy it did work out. At different times I was in touch with almost all key players in our very tiny industry about a co-production, and for different reasons we didn’t “click”, so to say, so it was a precious moment when we finally did click with Chewbahat. I think we were on the same page with most of the issues, and the amazing team of Racontr was on board with us too any time when we were attacking Gerald with new crazy ideas of what we can do with material. Pretty much everything is possible with these guys, I must say!

I’d like to thank the authors for this superb photographic work that inspired us to create this interactive documentary. Gerald from Chewbahat.

You can discover the French version of this interactive documentary on Mediapart for now here: http://ow.ly/tcObI

We wish you Happy Holidays! Have fun, take care, and see ya all in 2014!